The Pens...

The Limited Edition Fountain Pens Of Henry Simpole...

The Snake...


The development of Henry's Snake pattern fountain pen has involved as much care and craftmanship as those that first caught the eye and imagination of pen connoisseurs nearly 100 years ago. His search for the very best materials for both pen and box extended way beyond London...

Henry's Snake pen is crafted from polished black hard rubber by a small manufacturer close to the famous motor racing town of Le Mans in France and the nib from flexible two-tone 18ct Gold by craftsmen in Germany.

The Snake's eyes are polished cut emeralds. The 925 solid Sterling Silver edition is limited to 250 pieces and display Hallmarks from the London Assay Office and the Millenium stamp. Just 50 of the solid 18ct Gold Snake pens will be made, fully Hallmarked as above. All of the pens are numbered and are accompanied by a signed certificate of authentification.

Two variations of cap design have been produced, as shown on the image above. One with a Snake as the clip and the more popular, full overlay clipless version.

Henry's creative flair flows through to the presentation box. His exclusive design was produced by a specialist maker in London and compliments the pen beautifully.


The Jasmin Pen...


The challenging detail in the Jasmin Pen design was inspired by a Jasmin pattern pen created by George W. Heath, a New Jersey jeweller, who made precious metal overlays for pens produced by Parker, Waterman and Conklin in the early 1900's.

The three-dimensional pattern of Henry's pen echoes the delicate beauty of the Jasmin flower's leaves. The solid silver Jasmin Pen is a limited edition of 50 and the 18ct Gold Jasmin will be made - and numbered - to order. Each pen will carry the full London Assay Office hallmarks as well as Henry's personal hallmark - his initials HCS.

The base pen is crafted from Ebonite (black hard rubber) and turned on a lathe - as was traditional in early fountain pen manufacture - by the Conway Stewart Pen Company based in Devon. Some experimental prototype examples (shown in the Jasmin Portfolio on this site) have been made from red and black mottled hard rubber.

The Jasmin Pen nibs in flexible two-tone 18ct Gold are made by craftsmen in Germany, while the presentation boxes, designed by Henry, are made exclusively by a specialist box maker in London.

The Jasmin Pen is named after Jasmin Cameron, a founder member of the Writing Equipment Society, whose experience, advice and kindness ultimately led Henry onto a career in pens. The limited Edition Jasmin Pen is is Henry's tribute to Jasmin Cameron for encouragement in those early days.


The Tendril Pen...


The inspiration for this pattern came from a Japanese silver overlaid pen with a swirling, party-streamer-like pattern that Henry saw in a 1990's auction catalogue.

The solid silver Tendril Pen was made to a Limited Edition of just 6 pieces. The 18ct gold editions are made - and numbered - to order. Each base pen is again made by Conway Stewart and fitted with an 18ct gold Conway Stewart nib available in a choice of widths, from Fine to Broad Italic.


The William Morris Pen...


Inspired by the 19th Century English designer and master craftsman, this pen has again been produced without any production compromise.

Each cap and barrel overlay starts as a flat sheet of precious metal, and every piece of filigree is painstakingly pierced by hand. The sheets are then formed into cylindrical shapes on steel mandrills before the Arcanthus leaf pattern is freehand engraved on each piece - a highly skilled proces that takes many hours of labour.

The solid silver version is a Limited Edition of 25 pieces, and as with many of the otherr models the 18ct Gold versions are made and numbered strictly to order. Each pen will carry the full London Assay Office hallmarks as well as Henry's personal hallmark - his initials HCS. Each base pen is again made by Conway Stewart and fitted with an 18ct gold Conway Stewart nib available in a choice of widths, from Fine to Broad Italic.

When originally released, an example of this pen was on exhibition at The William Morris Gallery, Walthamstow, London.